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Core Reference : Chapters

   

Designing the Network Topology by Priscilla Oppenheimer — Prepare for the CCDA exam by gaining the ability to identify the advantages, disadvantages, scalability issues, and applicability of standard internetwork topologies.

ISDN by Gilbert Held — ISDN augurs the potential for the development of a universal digital network that provides integrated voice and data on common telephone company facilities. In this chapter, you'll examine the idea behind ISDN, its architecture, and some of the benefits that can be expected from its use.

Building Internetworks by Mark Sportack — Successfully designing, building, and implementing an internetwork depends on your understanding of the capabilities, limitations, and costs of each WAN component technology. Read on to form a better understanding of these components.

Managing Routing Protocols — In a real-world network, routing protocols must be managed, extended, and optimized to promote overall network stability, flexibility, and efficiency. Here, author Donald C. Lee covers the key techniques that help you achieve these objectives.

Deploying Basic Quality of Service Features — Here, author Donald C. Lee explains basic quality of service (QoS) principles and the configuration of the IOS queuing services that deliver QoS.

Deploying Basic Security Services — Your ability to leverage the security services of IOS is crucial to running a highly effective and robust Cisco network. Learn some basic concepts and common practices that are key to maintaining security.

The Gigabit Ethernet Modal Bandwidth Investigation — One of the fundamental problems that has plagued laser-based multimode fiber links is unpredictable bandwidth performance. Find out how the Gigabit Ethernet committee resolved this issue and the circumstances in which they did it.

Gigabit Ethernet in Context with Other LAN Technologies — You may be considering upgrading non-Ethernet technologies to Gigabit Ethernet technologies. Here, authors David G. Cunningham and William G. Lane discuss commonly installed LAN technologies and the suitability of Gigabit Ethernet as an upgrade for each.

The Future: Gigabit Ethernet and Beyond — Authors Cunningham and Lane raise some important issues regarding the future of Gigabit Ethernet, including their thoughts on 1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet, link aggregation, and the use of Gigabit Ethernet in WDM-based virtual MANs/WANs.

Designing the Network Topology — Gain a basic understanding of how security technologies can be used to establish identity, and assure data integrity and confidentiality in a network. Gain an understanding of how and when to implement technologies such as virtual private dial-up and public key infrastructure.

Provisioning Hardware and Media for the LAN — Find out how to create a security policy, including considerations such as physical and logical security controls. Implementation details are provided as examples of how to carry out part of the policy.

Provisioning Hardware and Media for the WAN — Gain insight into how to use firewalls to control internet access by examining sample firewall design implmentations. Configuration details are described for Cisco IOS devices and Cisco PIX firewalls, as well as other products if the functions are available.

Configuring Asynchronous Connections with Modems — Learn how to establish remote connections from a home office or telecommuter to a central site: including how to perform a reverse Telnet session to the modem, how to configure it for basic asynchronous operations, and how to use the modem autoconfiguration.

Configuring Point-to-Point Protocol and Controlling Network Access — The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) is often used to link remote nodes and remote LAN. Learn about the two authentication methods used by PPP: the Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) and the Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP).

Accessing the Central Site with Windows 95 — Find out how to configure a Windows 95 workstation to connect remotely via Dial-Up Networking. Learn how to use the connectivity tools that Windows 95 provides for mobile users.

Routing Metrics and Distances — To gain a full understanding of routing metrics and distances, you must understand the details of convergence and parallel paths, both of which are discussed here.

Using IP Unnumbered and VLSM — Author Robert Wright, CCIE, first explains IP unnumbered and then discusses variable-length subnet masking. The use of these functions with routing protocols that don't support them can have varying implications, as illustrated in the different scenarios.

Default Routing — You need to consider multiple factors when deciding the best way to implement connectivity to non-local subnets. Here, the fundamental issue of reaching devices on remote subnets is addressed and possible solutions are provided.

Switching Paths Overview

Multilayer Switching Overview

Routing Between Virtual LANs Overview

The Delta Method: Identifying Netowrk Change

The Napoleon Method: Divide and Conqure

The SOAP Method: Subjective Data, Objective Data, Analysis, and Plan

Windows Networking Basics

Internet/Intranet Troubleshooting

Reverse Engineering Somebody Elses' Network

Analyzing Business Goals and Constraints — Learn how to use a systematic, top-down process when designing computer networks for your customers. Focus is on the first step in top-down network design: analyzing your customer's business goals.

Designing a Network Topology — After reading this chapter, you will be prepared to design a secure, redundant, and hierarchical topology for a network design customer that will meet the customer's business and technical goals.

Optimizing Your Network Design — Learn about options for meeting performance expectations, such as IP multicast techniques that minimize bandwidth utilization for multimedia applications, methods for optimizing network performance to meet quality of service (QoS) requirements, and an assortment of optimization techniques offered by Cisco.

Routers and LANs — Routers can provide LAN administrators with a multitude of options for managing LANs and bolstering performance. Find out more about these options, including interconnecting LAN architectures, segmentation, and providing a gateway to the WAN.

Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol — Examine the architectural framework of EIGRP, its operational mechanics, and the similarities and differences between EIGRP and IGRP.

Building Internetworks — Successfully designing, building, and implementing an internetwork depends on your understanding of the capabilities, limitations, and costs of each WAN component technology. Read on to form a better understanding of these components.

IP Addressing — Study the details of IP address classes, network and node addresses, and subnet masking in preparation for Cisco System's CCNA exam. Then evaluate your understanding with the end-of-chapter test.

IP Routing Configuration — Prepare for the CCNA exam by studying static, default, and dynamic routing for IP. You'll also learn how to configure IP routing (including RIP and IGRP), and examine routing configuration and transaction information.

Basic Traffic Management with Access Lists — Based on ICRC course material, this chapter covers basic and extended access lists, how to control network traffic, and how to configure IP, IPX, and AppleTalk access lists, to help you prepare for Cisco's CCNA exam.

BGP Cores and Network Scalability — If you're already familiar with the basic operation of BGP, read on to find out how BGP can be used to scale your network even further.

Other Large Scale Cores — Scalability of full mesh, Layer 3 designs is a major issue when building very large networks. This chapter addresses two possible solutions to this problem: Net Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP) and Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS).

Designing the Network Topology — Prepare for the CCDA exam by gaining the ability to identify the advantages, disadvantages, scalability issues, and applicability of standard internetwork topologies.

Provisioning Hardware and Media for the LAN — Provisioning LAN media and hardware involves making many decisions, including which devices to use and what media to use to interconnect these devices. Complete the exercises provided here to assist you in learning how to make these decisions.

Provisioning Hardware and Media for the WAN — Do you recognize scalability constraints for WAN technologies? Can you recommend Cisco products and WAN technologies that will meet the customer's requirements for performance, capacity, and scalability? Read on to prepare for these real-world topics that you may encounter on the CCDA exam.

Setting Up a Reliable DHCP Service — Discusses specific ways in which the DHCP service might fail and presents solutions for those failure modes. Also describes some DHCP service implementations that provide additional reliability through redundant DHCP servers.

Tuning Your DHCP Service — Tune your DHCP service to provide the best assistance for your DHCP clients, and learn some of the tradeoffs you may have to make to get the smoothest possible service, given the needs of your site.

Authentication of DHCP Clients and Servers — Describes the IETF DHC Working Group's protocol draft for authentication of DHCP clients and servers, and reasons why this capability is needed.

Configuring IP Services — To configure optional IP services, you can complete any number of tasks depending on your network needs. Here, examine managing IP connections, filtering IP packets, configuring IP accounting, among other possibilities.

Configuring On-Demand Routing — On-Demand Routing (ODR) provides IP routing for stub sites with minimum overhead. Learn which tasks you must perform to configure ODR, and which tasks are optional.
Configuring RIP — RIP is a classical distance-vector protocol that is still commonly used today. Here, you'll learn the steps to take to configure RIP.

Configuring LAN Interfaces — Learn how to configure the LAN interfaces supported on Cisco routers and access servers, such as Ethernet, Fast EtherChannel, and Token Ring.

Configuring SMDS — The Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) is a wide-area networking service offered by some Regional Bell Operating Companies (RBOCs) and by MCI. Read on for more information about the configuration tasks for the SMDS packet-switched software.

Configuring X.25 and LAPB — Learn how to configure connections through Link Access Procedure, Balanced (LAPB) connections and X.25 networks. LAPB procedures are presented first before tackling how to configure Defense Data Network (DDN) X.25 and how to create X.29 access lists.

Internetwork Design Overview — If you've ever been tasked with a network design project--large or small--undoubtedly you have had to make several difficult design decisions. This chapter focuses on the goals of internetwork design, including the technical and business trade-offs you must understand prior to making design choices.

TCP/IP Design Overview — As a designer, knowing and understanding IP's benefits and limitations plays a tremendous role in your network's design. In this chapter, author Matthew Birkner discusses these IP design and scalability issues.

OSPF Design — Eventually, you may have to face the challenge of building scalable OSPF internetworks. In this chapter, find out how to use modular design and summarization features to meet this challenge.

Networking Devices — Study nodes, repeaters, signals, hubs, filters, ports, domains, bridges, and routers with this companion to Cisco's online Networking Academy, in preparation for CCNA certification.

TCP/IP — Learn the functions of the application, transport, and network layers of TCP/IP. You'll also study ICMP, ARP, RARP, UTP, and the concepts of reliable and unreliable protocols in this companion to Cisco Systems' Networking Academy.

Privacy Security Design — Learn how to analyze your environment to determine your security and privacy needs, and how to design your directory service to meet those needs.

Piloting Your Directory Service — Get a road map to guide you through the process of piloting your directory service, including pre-pilot testing, determining the scope and goals of your pilot, identifying the piloting environment you need, collecting feedback, and scaling up to simulate the load the service will experience in production.

Going Production — Learn how to create and execute successfully a plan for rolling out your directory service.

Configuring Policy-Based Routing — Here, you can explore the tasks you will need to perform to configure policy-based routing (PBR) on a router. PBR configuration examples are also provided.

Configuring QoS Policy Propagation via Border Gateway Protocol — Learn about the basic tasks necessary for configuring quality of service policy propagation via BGP on a router.

Congestion Management Overview — The congestion management QoS feature offers four types of queuing protocols--First-In, First-Out; Weighted Fair Queuing; Custom Queuing; and Priority Queuing--which are each discussed here.

Assembling and Cabling Cisco Devices — Learn how to cable Cisco devices to provide connectivity between switches and routers. An end of chapter quiz then helps you review and retain the concepts discussed.

Operating and Configuring a Cisco IOS Device — To install Cisco devices in your network, you must first understand the startup of the Cisco switch and router and be able to describe and recognize a boot sequence. Here, learn these skill and more.

Operating and Administering a TCP/IP Network — Apply the principles discussed here when designing, building, and running your TCP/IP network. Using these guidelines now will help you avoid headaches later.

Troubleshooting Common TCP/IP Problems — Need to know what's really happening on your network, not just what's supposed to be happening? Follow the general principles set forth here to begin debugging your network.

Asynchronous Modems and Interfaces — Held explains how modems work in terms of frequency, bandwidth, and modulation, and describes the data terminal equipment/data communications equipment (DTE/DCE) interface. Features covered include command sets, error detection and correction, data compression, and the Microcom MNP protocol.

Internet — Examine the evolution of the Internet, some of the protocols used to transport data, its addressing scheme, and a few of the applications that resulted in its progression from an academic-oriented facility to a network used by virtually everyone who has access to a computer. This chapter focuses on portions of the TCP/IP protocol suite.

ISDN — ISDN augurs the potential for the development of a universal digital network that provides integrated voice and data on common telephone company facilities. In this chapter, you'll examine the idea behind ISDN, its architecture, and some of the benefits that can be expected from its use.

Understanding Cisco's Internetwork Operating System (IOS) Software — To gain a full understanding of routing metrics and distances, you must understand the details of convergence and parallel paths, both of which are discussed here.

Understanding the OSI Reference Model — Author Robert Wright, CCIE, first explains IP unnumbered and then discusses variable-length subnet masking. The use of these functions with routing protocols that don't support them can have varying implications, as illustrated in the different scenarios.

Understanding Routing — You need to consider multiple factors when deciding the best way to implement connectivity to non-local subnets. Here, the fundamental issue of reaching devices on remote subnets is addressed and possible solutions are provided.

The Networker's Guide to TCP/IP — TCP/IP is the predominant network protocol in use today. Here author Michael J. Martin discusses the key elements of TCP/IP, including what each protocol in the suite does, its sequence in the suite, and services it needs to perform.

WAN Internetworking Technologies — The PSTN and various analog and digital transmission protocols and services that are used to provide wide area networking transmission links are covered here. Other topics addressed are SONET/SDH and public packet- and cell-switched data transmission technologies.

The Networker's Guide to TCP/IP — TCP/IP is the predominant network protocol in use today. Here author Michael J. Martin discusses the key elements of TCP/IP, including what each protocol in the suite does, its sequence in the suite, and services it needs to perform.

TCP/IP Basics — If you want specific information on configuring TCP/IP for Cisco IOS, check out this chapter. Network administrators will find this information beneficial before they leap into the additional subfeatures available to configure and enhance networks.

WAN Internetworking Technologies — The PSTN and various analog and digital transmission protocols and services that are used to provide wide area networking transmission links are covered here. Other topics addressed are SONET/SDH and public packet- and cell-switched data transmission technologies.

ISP Services and Characteristics — Expert Bassam Halabi stresses the importance of familiarizing yourself with basic provider services and characteristics that affect the quality of Internet connections. Find out what factors you need to prioritize. Hint: Price isn't one of them.

Interdomain Routing Basics — Here, Halabi builds on the concepts of addressing, global networks, and domains.

Controlling Large-Scale Autonomous Systems — Service providers, network administrators, and customers each face their own challenges when dealing with large-scale autonomous systems. Explore these challenges and the methods that can be used to better control the deployment of BGP inside these systems.

The Basics of Device Interfaces — Brush up on the basics of interface configurations and LAN and WAN technologies, including Fast Ethernet, Token Ring, HDLC, and ATM.

TCP/IP Basics — If you want specific information on configuring TCP/IP for Cisco IOS, check out this chapter. Network administrators will find this information beneficial before they leap into the additional subfeatures available to configure and enhance networks.

IXP Basics — Learn the fundamentals of the IPX protocol suite and the core commands for configuring and troubleshooting an IPX network. See some configuration examples here also.

Troubleshooting Ethernet — After a brief discussion of the basics of DECnet, this chapter addresses problems you may encounter and how you can go about resolving them.

Troubleshooting DECnet — After a brief discussion of the basics of DECnet, this chapter addresses problems you may encounter and how you can go about resolving them.

Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) — After a brief discussion of the basics of DECnet, this chapter addresses problems you may encounter and how you can go about resolving them.

Integrated IS-IS — Clear, complete coverage of the IS-IS routing protocol, including basic operation, configuration case studies, and troubleshooting.

Route Maps — Learn about this important technique for redistribution and policy routing through several detailed configuration case studies.

Networking Routing Fundamentals — Routing with a network, whether it is the Internet or an intranet, requires a certain amount of "common" information. Essential points such as IP addressing, internetwork components, and network protocols are covered here.

Introduction to OSPF — Here, learn the details of the background and evolution of the OSPF protocol by tracing the RFCs relating to OSPF. OSPF's capability to perform as a hierarchical routing protocol is also discussed.

Designing & Implementing an OSPF Network — Author Thomas M. Thomas takes the mystery out of designing any type of network. Although OSPF is emphasized, the concepts and steps discussed here have universal application whether your network is BGP or OSPF.

Transmission System Identifiers and Logical Address Mapping: A View from the Bottom — How familiar are you with the OSI Reference Model extension called Internal Organization of the Network Layer? Find out more about this extension and how it provides a basis for mapping between logical and transmission system addresses.

The Existing IP and Non-IP Address Structure: Preparing for Remodeling — How will your new network carry non-IP protocols across the backbone? Author Howard Berkowitz addresses this and other issues in this chapter.

Addressing and Name Services — Interaction between DNS services and addressing as well as the address structure among DNS servers themselves.

Layer 2 Ethernet Switching — Layer 2 switches are incredibly useful devices for building fast, affordable Ethernets of all sizes. Take an in-depth look at the concept, standards, and practical uses of this technology.

VLANs and Layer 3 Switching — Once you're familiar with Layer 2 switching, delve into this chapter for an overview of Layer 3 switching and virtual LANs. Find out more about Layer 4 switching also.

Deployment — In network design, you must understand the effects of server placement on various groups of clients before embarking on a full-scale upgrade of your network. This chapter walks you through the six steps to deployment that you need to take.

Extending IP Addresses Using VLSMs (Variable- Length Subnet Masks) — Explore the key components related to IP addressing, including variable-length subnet masks and route summarization. Knowing these IP addressing techniques enables you to define an appropriate IP address scheme for your network.

Optimizing Routing Update Operation — Before you can design and configure an efficient routing environment, you need to understand the capability for controlling when and how routers receive and send routing updates. The capabilities covered here include passive interfaces, default routes, route filtering, and more.

Configuring Transparent Bridging and Integrated Routing and Bridging — Transparent bridging and integrated routing and bridging (IRB) are two router configuration options available to handle non-routable traffic. Information provided here will help you be able to identify the need for these configuration options.

Medium Access Control (MAC) Layer — In-depth coverage of MAC Layer operations, MAC frame structure, and MAC frame types, for a better understanding of design options for and tuning of an 802.11 network.

Physical (PHY) Layer — Details of the Physical Layer architecture and operations, plus frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) physical layer, direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) physical layer, and infrared (IR) physical layer.

Migration Techniques — Many network problems are related to poor planning and failure to anticipate network growth. Here, learn techniques for migrating to a different routing protocol and methods for scaling the protocol you may already be using by repairing damaged architecture.

Protocol Independent Multicast — Deploying multicast on a very large scale is an evolving practice. Explore some of the methods that are simplifying this process, including PIM sparse-dense mode, auto RP, and MSDP.

Quality of Service Features — Take an in-depth look at Cisco features available for congestion management and avoidance. A case study and review questions help you work through these concepts.

VLANs — The term Virtual LAN is applied to many things. Find out what defines a VLAN in a Catalyst environment, as well as guidance on their optimal employment and configuration.

Understanding Spanning Tree — The Spanning Tree Protocol is a loop prevention protocol required to prevent broadcast storms and bridge table corruption. Explains the five STP states, STP timers, and BPDU's.

Advanced Spanning Tree — Learn how to use SPT as a tool for advanced functionality such as load balancing, fast STP convergence, per-VLAN Spanning tree plus (PVST+), and more.

Core PKI Services: Authentication, Integrity, and Confidentiality

PKI-Enabled Services

Key and Certificate Management

Designing ATM Networks — Here, network designers can explore ATM technology to see how it can be implemented in their network today and in the future.

Designing DLSw+ Networks — Here, network designers can explore ATM technology to see how it can be implemented in their networks today and in the future.

 

 

Breaking News

One of the primary architects of OpenCable, Michael Adams, explains the key concepts of this initiative in his book OpenCable Architecture.

Expert Advice

Ralph Droms, Ph.D., author of The DHCP Handbook and chair of the IETF Dynamic Host Configuration Working Group, guides you to his top picks for reliable DHCP-related information.

Just Published

Residential Broadband, Second Edition
by George Abe

Introduces the topics surrounding high-speed networks to the home. It is written for anyone seeking a broad-based familiarity with the issues of residential broadband (RBB) including product developers, engineers, network designers, business people, professionals in legal and regulatory positions, and industry analysts.

             
     

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