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Configuring RIP

   

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Configuring RIP

  

 

RIP Configuration Task List

  

 

Enable RIP

  

 

Allow Unicast Updates for RIP

  

 

Apply Offsets to Routing Metrics

  

 

Adjust Timers

  

 

Specify a RIP Version

  

 

Enable RIP Authentication

  

 

Disable Route Summarization

  

 

Run IGRP and RIP Concurrently

  

 

Disable the Validation of Source IP Addresses

  

 

Enable or Disable Split Horizon

  

 

Configure Interpacket Delay

  

 

RIP Configuration Examples

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Cisco IOS 12.0 Solutions for Network Protocols, Volume I: IP

From: Cisco IOS 12.0 Solutions for Network Protocols, Volume I: IP
Author: Technologies Riva; Systems Cisco
Publisher: Cisco Press (53)
More Information

7. Configuring RIP

This chapter describes how to configure RIP. For a complete description of the RIP commands that appear in this chapter, refer to Chapter 8, “RIP Commands.” To locate documentation of other commands that appear in this chapter, you can search online at www.cisco.com.

The Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is a relatively old, but still commonly used, interior gateway protocol (IGP) that was created for use in small, homogeneous networks. It is a classical distance-vector routing protocol. RIP is documented in RFC 1058.

RIP uses broadcast User Datagram Protocol (UDP) data packets to exchange routing information. The Cisco IOS software sends routing information updates every 30 seconds; this process is termed advertising. If a router does not receive an update from another router for 180seconds or more, it marks the routes served by the nonupdating router as being unusable. If there is still no update after 240 seconds, the router removes all routing table entries for the nonupdating router.

The metric that RIP uses to rate the value of different routes is hop count. The hop count is the number of routers that can be traversed in a route. A directly connected network has a metric of zero; an unreachable network has a metric of 16. This small range of metrics makes RIP an unsuitable routing protocol for large networks.

If the router has a default network path, RIP advertises a route that links the router to the pseudonetwork 0.0.0.0. The network 0.0.0.0 does not exist; RIP treats 0.0.0.0 as a network to implement the default routing feature. The Cisco IOS software will advertise the default network if a default was learned by RIP, or if the router has a gateway of last resort and RIP is configured with a default metric.

RIP sends updates to the interfaces in the specified networks. If an interface's network is not specified, it will not be advertised in any RIP update.

Cisco's implementation of RIP Version 2 supports plain text and MD5 authentication, route summarization, classless interdomain routing (CIDR), and variable-length subnet masks (VLSMs).

For protocol-independent features, which also apply to RIP, see Chapter 19, “Configuring IP Routing Protocol-Independent Features.”

RIP Configuration Task List

To configure RIP, complete the tasks in the following sections. You must enable RIP. The remaining tasks are optional.

  • Enable RIP

  • Allow Unicast Updates for RIP

  • Apply Offsets to Routing Metrics

  • Adjust Timers

  • Specify a RIP Version

  • Enable RIP Authentication

  • Disable Route Summarization

  • Run IGRP and RIP Concurrently

  • Disable the Validation of Source IP Addresses

  • Enable or Disable Split Horizon

  • Configure Interpacket Delay

For information about the following topics, see Chapter 19, “Configuring IP Routing Protocol-Independent Features.”

  • Filtering RIP information

  • Key management (available in RIP Version 2)

  • VLSM

   

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